Jumat, 15 Januari 2021

Sea shanties are your soundtrack of 2021. Seriously - CNN

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  1. Sea shanties are your soundtrack of 2021. Seriously  CNN
  2. How sea shanty TikTok and 'Wellerman' took over the internet  Los Angeles Times
  3. Sea shanties have taken over TikTok. Here's why  CNET
  4. It’s Not Just Sea Shanties—Scottish Energy Is Already Defining 2021  Vanity Fair
  5. Sea Shanty expert: TikTok's 'The Wellerman' isn't a sea shanty  INSIDER
  6. View Full Coverage on Google News
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January 16, 2021 at 02:40AM
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Sea shanties are your soundtrack of 2021. Seriously - CNN

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US blacklists CNOOC for “bullying” in the South China Sea - WorldOil

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1/15/2021

(Bloomberg) --China’s biggest offshore driller is being targeted in the final days of President Donald Trump’s administration for its activity in the South China Sea.

China National Offshore Oil Corp. has for years drilled in waters far from its borders, and within 200 miles of countries including Vietnam and the Philippines. The activity amounts to the oil giant acting like a “bully” for China’s military to intimidate its neighbors, U.S. Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross said in a statement Thursday announcing the move, which restricts access to U.S. technologies without specific permission.

China Foreign Ministry spokesman Zhao Lijian

China Foreign Ministry spokesman Zhao Lijian

“This measure by the Trump administration, once again, demonstrates to the public, to the international community what is unilateralism, double standards and bullying,” China Foreign Ministry spokesman Zhao Lijian told a briefing in Beijing on Friday. “The Chinese side will take necessary measures to ensure the legitimate and lawful rights and interests of Chinese companies, and we will stand by our companies, to protect, to uphold their rights and interests in accordance with law.”

CNOOC is aware of the U.S. decision and will continue to monitor the progress, the company said in an emailed statement.

While CNOOC has been embroiled in territorial disputes for drilling near Vietnam and the Philippines, most of its actual production in the South China Sea is much closer to home. The region is a “core operation area,” according to the firm’s most recent annual report.

The eastern South China Sea accounted for about 242,000 barrels of oil equivalent a day for the company in 2019, about 17% of total production, in depths ranging from 100 to 1,500 meters, according to CNOOC filings. The firm is developing the Yangjiang Sag, a subsea fault southwest of Hong Kong, and made seven new discoveries across the region in 2019.

Oil reserves in contested South China Sea waters

Oil reserves in contested South China Sea waters

The western South China Sea provided about 164,000 barrels a day, about 12% of its total production. Projects there range in depth from 40 to 1,500 meters, and include fields surrounding Hainan island such as Lingshui 17-2, the first major deepwater gas field independently developed in China.

Philippine company PXP Energy Corp. said in October it was in talks with CNOOC for joint oil and gas exploration in the South China Sea.

“It’s unlikely that CNOOC would stop its long-standing offshore drilling in China’s territory for Trump’s random decision-making in the last days of his tenure,” said Lin Boqiang, director at Xiamen University’s China Center for Energy Economics Research.

China National Petroleum Corp. and Sinopec, which have not been targeted with sanctions, are major oil importers, including of U.S. crude. Unlike its larger peers, CNOOC’s focus is on offshore drilling and exploration. Such activity is deeply technical, requiring sophisticated software and technology sourced from a variety of global firms, including several from the U.S.

“The biggest concern for CNOOC is if the sanctions disrupt technology and equipment imports,” said Li Li, an analyst with Shanghai-based commodities researcher ICIS-China. The firm relies on international companies for things such as rig equipment, shipping and maintenance work. “China may not have comparable patented domestic products for replacement,” Li said.

CNOOC does have an equipment subsidiary, China Oilfield Services Ltd., with advanced technology of its own. State media reported on Friday that CNOOC launched the world’s first 100,000-ton deep-water semi-submersible oil production and storage facility for a field near Hainan.

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January 15, 2021 at 06:45PM
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US blacklists CNOOC for “bullying” in the South China Sea - WorldOil

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Cold-stunned sea turtles are turning up. TPWD officials rescued several this week. - San Antonio Express-News

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Sea turtles hate the cold as much as we do.

On Wednesday, staff from the Texas Parks and Wildlife Department rescued several cold-stunned sea turtles found in Matagorda Bay, according to a Facebook post from Coastal Fisheries - Texas Parks and Wildlife. The bay is about 80 miles northeast of Corpus Christi.

With the recent chilly weather in Texas, the water temperature sometimes drops below 50 degrees Fahrenheit, causing the cold-blooded reptiles to become lethargic and unable to swim.

READ ALSO: Officials hope to open new fishing pier in Rockport-Fulton within the month

According to the National Park Service, the sea turtles float up to the surface and leave them vulnerable to boat strikes. They also can wash ashore and become stranded. If not rescued quickly, these defenseless animals often die of shock, predation or trauma due to boat strikes.

This is a yearly occurance for federal agencies, state agencies, non-profit organizations, and beach patrolling officers who actively search and rescue the cold-stunned turtles during the winter months. The turtles are released back into the wild once rehabilitated at specially designated, temporary holding facilities.

The number of cold-stunned green sea turtles found along the South Texas coast has increased significantly in recent years due to the rise in chilly weather and in the green turtle population, according to NPS.

Although the population increases, sea turtles are considered a threatened species by both the state and the federal government.

If you find a stranded or cold-stunned sea turtle, report it by flagging down a law enforcement officer or call 1-866-TURTLE5.

Priscilla Aguirre is a general assignment reporter for MySA.com | priscilla.aguirre@express-news.net | @CillaAguirre

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January 16, 2021 at 12:31AM
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St. Madeleine Sophie’s Center to host annual Tea by the Sea virtually on Jan. 23 - Del Mar Times

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St. Madeleine Sophie’s Center (SMSC), a local nonprofit organization that has been serving adults with intellectual and developmental disabilities for over 50 years, will hold its annual Tea by the Sea event virtually this year. The event will be held on Saturday, Jan. 23, from noon to 1 p.m. and will benefit the Sophie’s Gallery art program that is currently offered to over 400 students at SMSC.

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This year’s Tea by the Sea honorary chairs are Maureen King and Angel Kleinbub. Guests are encouraged to dress in their favorite tea-time attire and celebrate together, virtually, to support St. Madeleine Sophie’s Center. Tickets are $135 per person or $1,350 for a virtual table of 10. Each ticket purchase will include a tea set gift basket, recipe cards, one entry for the opportunity drawing, and a virtual cooking demonstration. Guests will receive a link to the virtual event one week prior to the event.

“We are excited to carry on our Virtual Tea By the Sea event and partner with Shakespeare’s Corner Shoppe and Afternoon Tea. Each participant will receive a lovely tea basket delivered to their home prior to the Virtual Tea on Saturday, Jan. 23. I would like to thank our Tea by the Sea Co-Chairs Maureen King and Angel Kleinbub for their continuous support,” said Debra Emerson, CEO of SMSC. She added, “This event continues to support Sophie’s Art Department, where our staff have been working virtually with our students through zoom and delivering art supplies for all of our art programs and shows during these difficult times.”

St. Madeleine Sophie’s Center is a nonprofit organization that serves more than 400 adults with intellectual and developmental disabilities through nationally recognized, innovative programs. Its mission is to educate and empower individuals with intellectual and developmental disabilities to realize their full potential. Developmental disabilities include autism, Down syndrome, cerebral palsy and other cognitive disorders for which there are no cures.

To purchase your tickets, visit www.smscteabythesea.org. There are also various sponsorship and underwriting opportunities available. For more information, contact either Joe Perucca at 619-442-5129, ext. 332 or jperucca@stmsc.org, or Katie Pennell at 619-442-5129, ext. 115 or kpennell@stmsc.org.

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January 16, 2021 at 04:00AM
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St. Madeleine Sophie’s Center to host annual Tea by the Sea virtually on Jan. 23 - Del Mar Times

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Why South China Sea Is Key to Blacklisted Oil Giant Cnooc - Bloomberg

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  1. Why South China Sea Is Key to Blacklisted Oil Giant Cnooc  Bloomberg
  2. U.S. imposes new sanctions on Beijing over South China Sea violations  PBS NewsHour
  3. US imposes sanctions on China's CNOOC oil company over South China Sea  DW (English)
  4. U.S. imposes sanctions on Chinese officials, oil giant over South China Sea 'coercion'  Reuters.com
  5. US Blacklists China's CNOOC over South China Sea  Offshore Engineer
  6. View Full Coverage on Google News
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January 15, 2021 at 04:27PM
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Why South China Sea Is Key to Blacklisted Oil Giant Cnooc - Bloomberg

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Why TikTok (and Everyone Else) Is Singing Sea Chanteys - WIRED

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The Monitor is a weekly column devoted to everything happening in the WIRED world of culture, from movies to memes, TV to Twitter.

Earlier this week, it seemed inevitable that this column would have something to do with the second impeachment of President Trump. In a week when Republicans were likening the impeachment of the president to a “canceling” and saying that Twitter booting Trump was akin to censorship, it was tempting to weigh in. (If free speech is being stifled, how is it possible that it’s all I hear about on every major media outlet in the world? How?) But I digressed. Why? Sea chanteys.

To get everyone up to speed, sea chanteys are the smiling woman in the Distracted Boyfriend meme—they pull your attention away no matter what should be occupying your time. Originating on merchant marine ships in the 18th century, the songs—meant to help sailors through their tasks—started taking off on TikTok after a 26-year-old Scottish postman named Nathan Evans posted a video of himself singing a song called “Soon May the Wellerman Come” (sometimes just titled “Wellerman”) in the last week of 2020. It’s been duetted thousands of times since and has become an online obsession. (If you have not yet scrolled r/seashanties you really ought to.)

Why? Why, in the middle of a political crisis in the US and a global pandemic, has everyone turned to songs that sound like what the Decemberists were trying to be? The conclusion most folks have come to is that sea chanteys are a respite. That at a time when people have to be far apart, joining together in song—even over TikTok—feels like a moment of togetherness, or socially distant karaoke. (God, I miss karaoke.) “They are unifying, survivalist songs, designed to transform a huge group of people into one collective body,” Kathryn VanArendonk wrote for Vulture, “all working together to keep the ship afloat.” Similarly, as Amanda Petrusich noted in The New Yorker, “it seems possible that after nearly a year of solitude and collective self-banishment, and of crushing restrictions on travel and adventure, the chantey might be providing a brief glimpse into a different, more exciting way of life, a world of sea air and pirates and grog, of many people singing in unison, of being free to boldly take off for what Melville called the ‘true places,’ the uncorrupted vistas that can’t be located on any map.” (As to the spelling discrepancies between “shanty” and “chantey” your guess is as good as mine.)

These things are undoubtedly true. After nearly a year of quarantines and fear, having something simple that you can sing along to even if you’re halfway tone-deaf is welcome. The unironic embrace of something that feels old and ethereal also fits right in with the spirit of TikTok. But at the same time, collective culture consumption has been one of the hallmarks of the pandemic, from a collective obsession with Tiger King to “WAP.” Not to mention, gamers were singing chanteys while playing Sea of Thieves long before the pandemic hit. Yes, some of this popularity came courtesy of the Longest Johns, the a cappella folk band that released a version of “Wellerman” in 2018, but still.

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January 15, 2021 at 11:55AM
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Phytoplankton factory in the Argentine Sea - Phys.org

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Phytoplankton Factory in the Argentine Sea
January 5, 2021. Credit: NASA Earth Observatory

The Goldilocks zone typically refers to the habitable area around a star where conditions are right for the existence of liquid water and possibly life. But on Earth, the South Atlantic Ocean has its own kind of Goldilocks zone. In spring and summer, conditions in the Argentine Sea off Patagonia often become just right for phytoplankton, and populations of the plant-like organisms explode into enormous blooms.

In late 2020, started to show the colorful signature of off the coast of Argentina and around the Falkland Islands (Islas Malvinas). Vivid greens and blues still swirled in the sea on January 5, 2021, when the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) on NASA's Terra satellite acquired this natural-color image (above).

The Operational Land Imager (OLI) on Landsat 8 acquired the image below on January 2, 2021. It shows a detailed view of phytoplankton in Grande Bay, off of Argentina's Santa Cruz province. Part of the Santa Cruz River is visible at the top-left.

Rivers like the Santa Cruz carry nutrients from the land and deliver them to the ocean, promoting phytoplankton growth. (Suspended sediment could be contributing some of the color visible in these images.) Another source of nutrients is dust from Patagonia, which strong westerly winds can carry offshore and drop on the ocean surface.

But phytoplankton blooms are also stimulated by the ocean's complex circulation patterns and abundant fronts—where separate water masses (with distinct temperatures, saltiness, and nutrients) meet. At the Brazil-Malvinas Confluence, for example, warm, saltier tropical waters flow south and meet the cooler, fresher waters flowing north from the Southern Ocean. Along a front, the rising of a less-dense mass can carry nutrients up to the surface, where phytoplankton also have ample sunlight to fuel their growth.

Phytoplankton Factory in the Argentine Sea
January 2, 2021. Credit: NASA Earth Observatory

Without a physical sample, it's not possible to say for sure which type of phytoplankton are present in these images. Scientists found dinoflagellates (Prorocentrum minimum) while collecting samples during an intense bloom in spring 2005; diatoms (Chaetocceros debilis) dominated a bloom in early summer 2003. Both groups tend to appear various shades of green in satellite images. In December 2008, scientists also found a dense of coccolithophores (Emiliania huxleyi), which tend to turn the ocean a chalky green-blue.

Notice the color gradients across the images. Bright green areas could be a mix of dinoflagellates, diatoms, and coccolithophores; in the bluer areas, coccolithophores likely dominate. Coccolithophores can continue to grow in waters where iron has been depleted, whereas diatoms need both silicate and iron.

Whichever species were blooming, their abundance indicates the biological richness along Patagonia's continental shelf, which is the site of some of the world's richest fisheries.


Explore further

Image: Spring color in the North Sea

More information: Gastón O. Almandoz et al. The genus Pseudo-nitzschia (Bacillariophyceae) in continental shelf waters of Argentina (Southwestern Atlantic Ocean, 38–55°S), Harmful Algae (2006). DOI: 10.1016/j.hal.2006.07.003

William M. Balch et al. Coccolithophore distributions of the North and South Atlantic Ocean, Deep Sea Research Part I: Oceanographic Research Papers (2019). DOI: 10.1016/j.dsr.2019.06.012

W. M. Balch et al. Surface biological, chemical, and optical properties of the Patagonian Shelf coccolithophore bloom, the brightest waters of the Great Calcite Belt, Limnology and Oceanography (2014). DOI: 10.4319/lo.2014.59.5.1715

José I. Carreto et al. Mycosporine-like amino acids and xanthophyll-cycle pigments favour a massive spring bloom development of the dinoflagellate Prorocentrum minimum in Grande Bay (Argentina), an ozone hole affected area, Journal of Marine Systems (2017). DOI: 10.1016/j.jmarsys.2017.10.004

Vivian A. Lutz et al. Primary production in the Argentine Sea during spring estimated by field and satellite models, Journal of Plankton Research (2009). DOI: 10.1093/plankt/fbp117

Alberto R. Piola et al. Physical Oceanography of the SW Atlantic Shelf: A Review, Plankton Ecology of the Southwestern Atlantic (2018). DOI: 10.1007/978-3-319-77869-3_2

Provided by NASA Earth Observatory

Citation: Phytoplankton factory in the Argentine Sea (2021, January 15) retrieved 15 January 2021 from https://ift.tt/35KMNnr

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January 15, 2021 at 07:19PM
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North Carolina rare sea turtle found dead on Outer Banks - WXII12 Winston-Salem

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A species of sea turtle that is rarely seen on North Carolina’s Outer Banks has been found dead in a Frisco marsh near the Pamlico Sound.The Virginian-Pilot reported Tuesday that biologists have so far been unable to find a cause of death of the leatherback sea turtle.Click the video player above for headlines from WXII 12 News.The creature weighed upwards of 500 pounds. And biologists solicited the help of a construction company’s crane to lift the dead animal onto a barge and take it in for a necropsy.Biologists with the North Carolina Wildlife Resources Commission and the National Park Service found no obvious cause of death. The investigation revealed no physical injuries, plastics in the intestines or major parasites. But the animal’s organs suggested the animal was under physiological stress. Leatherback sea turtles are especially rare on the Outer Banks and are typically not bothered by cold water. Lou Browning of Hatteras Island Wildlife Rehabilitation said leatherback turtles are “beautiful creatures that we know so little about.”

A species of sea turtle that is rarely seen on North Carolina’s Outer Banks has been found dead in a Frisco marsh near the Pamlico Sound.

The Virginian-Pilot reported Tuesday that biologists have so far been unable to find a cause of death of the leatherback sea turtle.

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Click the video player above for headlines from WXII 12 News.

The creature weighed upwards of 500 pounds. And biologists solicited the help of a construction company’s crane to lift the dead animal onto a barge and take it in for a necropsy.

Biologists with the North Carolina Wildlife Resources Commission and the National Park Service found no obvious cause of death. The investigation revealed no physical injuries, plastics in the intestines or major parasites. But the animal’s organs suggested the animal was under physiological stress.

Leatherback sea turtles are especially rare on the Outer Banks and are typically not bothered by cold water. Lou Browning of Hatteras Island Wildlife Rehabilitation said leatherback turtles are “beautiful creatures that we know so little about.”

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January 15, 2021 at 10:38AM
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Resolute: An integrated model for climate and sea duty attractiveness - DVIDS

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By Ensign Alexander Cordes

In 2019, the RAND Corporation conducted an Analysis of Major Cutter Employment. Among the themes that emerged was camaraderie, which resonated with 66 percent of respondents, and command and leadership, 77 percent noted.

Both factors are affected by the makeup of the crew and the culture that manifests on the cutter. The other significant themes — routine, mission type, time away from homeport, training are intrinsic to going to sea. It is up to the command to partner with the crew to manage these things to achieve mission goals and professional development.

This summer, 13 petty officers reported to USCGC Resolute (WMEC 620) as part of the cutter's enlisted women's integration, making Resolute the third 210-foot cutter in the Reliance-class fleet to do so. The crew and the command share their thoughts on what attracted them to sea and the benefits of this change.

With ratings ranging from boatswain's mate to operations specialist, electrician's mate and machinery technician to yeoman and storekeeper, Resolute's new crewmembers have added tremendous value to the cutter's diversity and operational effectiveness through their skills and background. For example, Petty Officer 2nd Class Jessica Potak, a boatswain's mate, brings significant coxswain experience from small boat stations and a fast response cutter, enhancing the cutter's counter-drug and alien migration interdiction operations.

Resolute's 78 member crew includes 14 female petty officers and two female junior officers who continue to pave the way for women to serve at sea. These professionals are across all shipboard disciplines, acting as an officer of the day, engineer of the watch, combat information center watch supervisor, or small boat coxswain.

Resolute's crew are proud and are eager to share their experiences to motivate the next generation of women to continue to serve at sea.
Women have served in the U.S. Coast Guard since 1830, first as lighthouse keepers and later in roles from telegraph operators to lawyers and pilots. World War II saw the establishment of the Women's Reserve, filling mostly clerical positions. The first women to serve in afloat billets came to pass in 1977 when 24 chosen women reported to the 378-foot cutters Gallatin and Morgenthau as permanent crew. All career fields and rates opened to women in 1978. However, the logistics of putting that commandant's direction into action is still maturing.

Many of Resolute's crew chose this cutter as their top pick due to mission, crew size, and an attractive location — St. Petersburg, Florida. However, there are still limited 210-foot cutter billets for women across the fleet.
Petty Officer 1st Class Erin Walters, a culinary specialist, noted, "It was a little disheartening to go through available CS billets and disregard a majority of them simply because they were 'male-only' crew arrangements. However, Resolute was my number one choice because I wanted to diversify my career portfolio and use this opportunity to play a larger role in the Coast Guard's significant operations afloat."

Petty Officer 1st Class Christine Fleming, an operations specialist, put Resolute and other cutters like it at the top of her list for more than eight years. "I knew many cutters were 'male-only' crews, but the detailer always told us there could be a chance if we put it on our lists. It seemed like a longshot for us, but it finally paid off!"

According to the women, the opportunities this platform offers are too good to pass up. For senior petty officers, achieving a leadership position within their rating is an outstanding professional opportunity. Petty Officer 1st Class Rebecca Davis, a yeoman, desired to get back underway for years following the conclusion of her tour on the 378-foot USCGC Hamilton (WHEC 715) in 2010. Due to limited afloat opportunities at the E-6 rank, options were limited and in demand. In terms of earning the designation of permanent cutterman or gaining points towards advancement, lack of sea time may negatively impact a career. When Resolute completed its integration, Davis jumped at the opportunity. She responded to the detailer's email within minutes and was excited for a chance to advance her personal and professional goals.

Petty Officer 2nd Class Andi Webster, a boatswain's mate, also long desired to serve aboard a medium endurance cutter. As a non-rate aboard USCGC Dauntless (WMEC 624) during their integration in 2014, Webster fell in love with the larger cutter platform's mission and crew dynamic. Her previous experience drove her to push for a return to the cutter fleet.

While she is excited about this opportunity, she is also focused on the bigger picture of the integration. "It's not just about the 13 of us, but all the women after us. Resolute's integration is another step toward providing more afloat opportunities to all who serve," said Webster.

Cmdr. Justin Vanden Heuvel, commanding officer of Resolute, has very personal connections to breaking military service barriers. His mother, Sharon Gassen, served in the Air Force, Air Force Reserve, Navy Reserve, DEA, FBI, and as a yeoman in the Coast Guard Reserve, witnessing numerous military growth and diversification milestones.

From her time in service, Gassen recalls, "the Coast Guard has always been unprecedented in its ability to provide an opportunity to women. Given our history, it does take time for things to change, but there is more opportunity today than ever."

Vanden Heuvel stated, "On Resolute, we value diversity and embrace the kind of behavioral qualities that, when fully realized, lead to mission success. I appreciate closely coordinating with Chief Petty Officer Ramona Mason, EPM -2's women's afloat detailer. While it's important to promote opportunities continually, it's even more important to create environments that treat the interaction between diverse people and groups as the norm."

Resolute is one of 14 active Reliance-class cutters in the U.S. Coast Guard portfolio. Built by the U.S. Coast Guard Yard in Maryland, it was commissioned in 1966 and carries the Service's first cutter's name, a top-sail schooner built in 1867. The cutter has been homeported on the East and West coasts and has several awards and significant cases to its name. Their motto is Fame Through Good Deeds, and the ship currently serves as a multi-mission platform to conduct Coast Guard missions throughout the Western Hemisphere.

Date Taken: 01.14.2021
Date Posted: 01.14.2021 11:49
Story ID: 386922
Location: ST. PETERSBURG, FL, US 

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January 14, 2021 at 11:49PM
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Kamis, 14 Januari 2021

Here is why TikTok is obsessed with sea shanties - TODAY - Today.com

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There's no denying that the past year has been weird, especially online: TikTok users have gone viral for unexpected food hacks, looking identical to celebrities and asking Miley Cyrus to make major life choices for them.

However, a new viral trend is baffling many: Why, exactly, are TikTok users from all over the world sharing videos of themselves singing sea shanties?

To get to the bottom of the mystery, we reached out to the singers themselves and a sea shanty expert (yes, you read that correctly), who said there's actually a few different reasons why the work songs are suddenly going viral.

What are sea shanties?

James Revell Carr, an associate professor of ethnomusicology in the College of Fine Arts at the University of Kentucky who has published a book about the history of music and performance aboard ships, defined sea shanties as a type of work song that originated in the 19th century. The songs are also known as "sea chanties."

"I think a lot of people assume that sea shanties go back for millennia, but as far as researchers can tell, the sea shanties that we know of today, with a couple of exceptions, come from the 19th century and started in the 1820s and 30s," he explained. "Shanties were songs that had specific rhythms that you would need for different jobs aboard a ship, (like) raising up the sail, pulling up the anchor and pumping water around the ship."

One of the most popular songs on TikTok is "Soon May the Wellerman Come," which dates back to the 19th century and appears to have originated in New Zealand. Known commonly as "Wellerman," many singers have recorded themselves singing the song or dueting it with other users. As of Thursday afternoon, videos tagged with #Wellerman on the platform had a total of 25.2 million views.

"My all time favorite (shanty) has got to be 'Wellerman,' just for the fact that I loved watching it grow and watching everyone duet it," said Nathan Evanss, 26, who is one of the most popular TikTok shanty singers.

Why are young adults singing them?

TMRW interviewed three TikTok users whose videos have gone viral, including Evans. Each of them said that they believe there's a few core reasons why the trend, which started circulating online a few months ago, suddenly went viral. (Carr said that sea shanties have always had a following, and have also been featured in video games like Assassin's Creed and movies like "Pirates of the Caribbean," so they've always bene somehow present in pop culture.)

One of the most common theories was that the songs, which are meant to be sung by a crew and do not require any musical training to be sung well, are a way for people to connect amid the isolation of the coronavirus pandemic.

"Everyone is feeling alone and stuck at home during this pandemic, and it gives everyone a sense of unity and friendship," said Evanss. "Shanties are great because they bring loads of people together and anyone can join in, you don't even need to be able to sing to join in on a sea shanty."

Sam Pope, a TikTok user from Kent, England, said that the focus on "joining in" made the trend especially appealing. Many users have taken advantage of TikTok's "duet" feature to share videos of themselves singing along with popular videos.

"It's group singing, it's community based, it's about people sticking together," Pope, 30, said. "It's about joining in and getting involved ... In general, people are reaching out for connection at the moment. People want to connect with each other and they want to join in, and this is the best music for that because there's no barrier."

Carr agreed with that assessment, drawing a parallel between the isolation of sailors at sea and people stuck at home during the pandemic.

"Crews that sang these songs were isolated with a small group of people, a pod of people, you might say, and this was how they entertained themselves and a way to talk about what they were going through and the hardships they were facing," he said. "So I feel like in this time of quarantine and anxiety about the world, shanties are serving a similar function for us."

Annamaria Christina, a TikTok user from Long Island, New York, who also shares her videos on Instagram, said some of the appeal of the songs might be connected to the sense of adventure that comes when one thinks about ships traveling the world.

"The idea of being a sailor (or) pirate and going out on adventures all over the world is the exact opposite of what so many of us are experiencing during this pandemic," said Christina, 24. "So I think allowing ourselves to imagine that we are the people in the songs has been a great form of escapism."

Carr drew other parallels between the situations of sailors and Internet users: Sailors on ships would have been around the same age as many of the video-makers, and many of the songs touch on topics that would still be relevant to young adults today.

"Sailors in the 19th century were in their late teens and their 20s," he said."They were young people who liked to drink and party. There's something about that that resonates with young people now."

The global and communal aspect of the sing-alongs also helps with their popularity: Carr said that almost every culture in the world has its own version of the sea shanty, and since TikTok is used around the world, people are able to share their own versions of the songs.

"Ships brought people together from lots of different backgrounds and different places, and they could all bond together through music," Carr said. "It was the one thing that they shared, culturally, and I think that's true today. You see people from all over the world really enjoying this music, and so there is something really, really special about that."

Aug. 19, 202006:27
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January 15, 2021 at 03:53AM
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Posidonia marine seagrass can catch and remove plastics from the sea: A trap for plastics in coastal areas - Science Daily

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Posidonia oceanica seagrass -- an endemic marine phanerogam with an important ecological role in the marine environment -- can take and remove plastic materials that have been left at the sea, according to a study published in the journal Scientific Reports. The article's first author is the tenure-track 2 lecturer Anna Sànchez-Vidal, from the Research Group on Marine Geosciences of the Faculty of Earth Sciences of the University of Barcelona (UB).

The study describes for the first time the outstanding role of the Posidonia as a filter and trap for plastics in the coastal areas, and it is pioneer in the description of a natural mechanism to take and remove these materials from the sea. Other authors of the study are the experts Miquel Canals, William P. de Haan and Marta Veny, from the Research Group on Marine Geosciences of the UB, and Javier Romero, from the Faculty of Biology and the Biodiversity Research Institute (IRBio) of the UB.

A trap for plastics in coastal areas

The Posidonia oceanica makes dense prairies that make a habitat with a great ecological value (nutrition, shelter, reproduction, etc.) for marine biodiversity. As part of the study, the team analysed the trapping and extraction of plastic in great seagrasses of the Posidonia in the coasts of Majorca. "Everything suggests that plastics are trapped in the Posidonia seagrass. In the grasslands, the plastics are incorporated to agglomerates of natural fiber with a ball shape -- aegagropila or Posidonia Neptune balls -- which are expulsed from the marine environment during storms," notes Anna Sànchez-Vidal, member of the Department of Ocean and Earth Dynamics of the UB.

According to the analyses, she continues, the trapped microplastics in the prairies of the Posidonia oceanica are mainly filaments, fibers and fragments of polymers which are denser than the sea water such as polyethylene terephthalate (PET).

How are Posidonia Neptune balls made?

This marine phanerogam has a vegetative structure made by a modified stem with a rhizome shape from which the roots and leaves appear. When the leaves fall, its bases (pods) are added to rhizomes and give them a feather-like appearance. "As a result of the mechanical erosion in the marine environment, those pods under the seafloors are progressively releasing lignocellulosic fibres which are slowly added and intertwined until they make agglomerates in a ball-shape, known as aegagropilae. Aegagropilae are expulsed from prairies during periods of strong waves and a certain part ends up in the beaches," says Professor Javier Romero, from the Department of Evolutionary Biology, Ecology and Environmental Sciences and the Biodiversity Research Institute (IRBio) of the UB.

Posidonia aegagropilae are expelled from the prairies during periods of strong waves and a part ends up piled in the beaches. Although there are no studies that quantify the amount of aegagropilae expelled from the marine environment, it is estimated that about 1,470 plastics are taken per kilogram of plant fibre, amounts which are significantly higher than those captured through leaves or sand. As researcher Anna Sànchez-Vidal says, "we cannot completely know the magnitude of this plastic export to the land. However, first estimations reveal that Posidonia balls could catch up to 867 million plastics per year."

Plastic-free oceans: everyone's responsibility

The polluting footprint of plastics that come from human activity is a serious environmental problem affecting coastal and ocean ecosystems worldwide. Since plastics were created massively in the 20th century fifties, these materials have been left and accumulated at the sea -- seafloors act as a sink for microplastics -- and are transported by ocean currents, wind and waves. "The plastics we find floating in the sea are only a small percentage of everything we have thrown onto the marine environment," warns Anna Sànchez-Vidal.

The paper published in the journal Scientific Reports has been carried out within the frame of the subject of the EHEA bachelor's degree final project of the degree in Marine Sciences of the Faculty of Earth Sciences, and counted on the support from the Scientific and Technological Centers of the UB (CCiTUB). The new ecosystemic service of the Posidonia described in the article has a significant value in a marine area such as the Mediterranean -- with high quantities of floating plastic and in the seafloors -- and with Posidonia seagrass that can occupy large areas up to forty meters deep.

"This is why we need to protect and preserve these vulnerable ecosystems. However, the best environmental protection strategy to keep oceans free of plastic is to reduce landfills, an action that requires to limit its use by the population," conclude the experts.

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Materials provided by University of Barcelona. Note: Content may be edited for style and length.

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January 15, 2021 at 03:55AM
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Posidonia marine seagrass can catch and remove plastics from the sea: A trap for plastics in coastal areas - Science Daily

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Sea Turtles saved from cold temperatures, flown south, and released in the Panhandle - WJXT News4JAX

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JACKSONVILLE, Fla. – I though no one hated cold weather more than I did, but I’m in good company with sea turtles. When water temperatures dip below 50°, sea turtles can become cold-stunned (or shocked) by the frigid temperatures. Environmental groups often comb beaches and bays to collect turtles that are cold-stunned and rehabilitate them for a later healthy release.

18 very lucky sea turtles were released in the panhandle of Florida on Thursday, after a private jet flight from New England through Turtles Fly Too.

The release included largely juvenile Kemp’s Ridley sea turtles that were flown down by Turtles Fly Too private jets late in 2020, as well as a few locally stranded juvenile green sea turtles that were rescued by members of the United States Geological Survey and the Florida Coastal Conservancy. All of the sea turtles being released were in rehabilitation due to cold-stunning.

Cold stunned turtles rehabilitated and released
Cold stunned turtles rehabilitated and released

Due to the large number of stranded turtles in New England, the New England Aquarium and the National Marine Life Center reached out to other members of the stranding network for assistance. Additionally, the green sea turtles were found locally in St. Joseph Bay after temporary cold snaps prompted search and rescue parties along the shore. These turtles are then transported to GWMI to be warmed up and released as soon as possible. All of the turtles have been medically cleared by GWMI veterinary staff and have been cleared for release by Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission.

Turtles Fly Too coordinated the flights from New England, and all of their pilots (GWMI received turtles from 3 separate flights) generously donated their time for the mission.

Cold Stunned Turtles flown via private jet through Turtles Fly Too to warmer waters
Cold Stunned Turtles flown via private jet through Turtles Fly Too to warmer waters

Turtle Flier team Chuck Yanke and Julie Tromblay, flew three different missions to Florida and other states to deliver the sea turtles.

This was part of a three-stop mission, where 96 sea turtles were dropped off to five different locations- Sea World Orlando, Mote Marine Laboratory & Aquarium, the Tampa Bay Aquarium, Clearwater marine Aquarium, and the 18 turtles released Thursday from The Gulf World marine Institute.

Turtles Fly Too transported 536 sea turtles in just two months in the year 2020.

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January 15, 2021 at 05:20AM
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New Zealand closes road for a month to let sea lions nest safely - CNN

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(CNN) — A New Zealand council has announced a month-long road closure in order to allow a sea lion and her pup to reach the ocean safely.
John Wilson Ocean Drive in Dunedin will be closed after the New Zealand sea lions made their home at a nearby golf course and started "regularly crossing the road to get to the beach," according to a Facebook post from Dunedin City Council published Monday.

"You can still visit the area by foot or bicycle, but please give the sea lions lots of space (at least 20m)," continued the post.

"If you're walking your dog in the area, please keep it on a lead as sea lions can be hard to spot."

Dunedin is the second-largest city on New Zealand's South Island.

Dunedin is the second-largest city on New Zealand's South Island.

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Locals commenting on the post applauded the decision, and one even called for the closure to be made permanent.

"No dogs should be on the beach either," wrote Gaylene Smith. "We need to protect our beautiful sealife."

Dogs are known to attack sea lions, and Chisholm Links Golf Course, where the sea lions have made their home, also posted advice to dog walkers in a Facebook update.

"We're lucky to have marine mammals on our coastline and we need to share the space with them, as this is what makes our coastal Links and Dunedin's coastline so unique!" wrote the course on Facebook on January 5.

The council went on to explain that New Zealand sea lions are endangered, and one of the world's rarest species of sea lion.

There are an estimated 12,000 New Zealand sea lions left, according to the Department of Conservation. Under local law, anyone who kills a sea lion could face up to two years in prison or a fine of up to NZ$250,000 (US$178,000).

In December 2019 a Dunedin man sparked anger after spearing a sea lion while diving.

Matt Kraemer posted on Facebook that he and his partner were diving for paua -- a type of abalone -- on Friday when they encountered a "particularly aggressive" sea lion with "lion-sized jaws."

Kraemer said he stabbed the sea lion to protect his partner, but his actions were roundly condemned.

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January 14, 2021 at 08:34PM
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Lush meadows of underwater seagrass are removing plastic from the sea - New Scientist

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Mediterranean seagrass traps plastic particles in its leaves

Jordi Regàs

Underwater seagrass may be naturally trapping millions of pieces of marine plastic and removing them from the sea.

Posidonia oceanica, a seagrass endemic to the Mediterranean, forms lush meadows on the sea floor in coastal waters up to 40 metres deep.

When P. oceanica sheds leaves, fibres in the leaf sheaths intertwine, forming tangles known as Neptune balls. Anna Sanchez-Vidal at the University of Barcelona in Spain and her colleagues have found that these balls trap plastic items.

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“When there’s a storm, and these balls are ejected from the sea to land, the plastic also is ejected back to shore,” says Sanchez-Vidal.

Her team estimates that these Neptune balls may trap up to 867 million plastic items in the Mediterranean Sea every year.

Between 2018 and 2019, the team measured the amount of plastic collected from seagrass litter from four beaches in Mallorca, Spain, which has high levels of plastic near the shore, as well as widespread seagrass meadows.

The team found plastic debris in half of the 42 loose seagrass leaf samples they took, with up to 613 plastic items per kilogram of loose leaves.

Of the 198 Neptune balls of P. oceanica fibres that the team collected, 17 per cent had intertwined plastic items.

The finding points to the need for better conservation of seagrass meadows, says Sanchez-Vidal. “Strict measures should be taken to protect these systems,” she says.

In addition to their newly discovered role in trapping and removing plastic, seagrass meadows are also an important reservoir of carbon dioxide and sediment, and a nursery area for many marine animals.

P. oceanica is found only in the Mediterranean Sea, but other related seagrass species are found in shallow waters off the coast of Australia. It is unclear whether other species are able to form Neptune balls and function similarly in removing plastic.

Journal reference: Scientific Reports, DOI: 10.1038/s41598-020-79370-3

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January 14, 2021 at 11:08PM
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The Delights of Sea-Chantey TikTok - The New Yorker

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In late December, Nathan Evans, a twenty-six year old singer from Scotland, posted a TikTok of himself performing a multi-part sea chantey titled “The Scotsman.” Evans sang the piece a capella, in a rich, trembling baritone, while pounding his fists and clapping his hands. “The Scotsman” nails the essential gist—Girls! Booze! Travails!—of the sea chantey, a style of traditional folk song that, historically, was sung in unison by sailors, either to pass the time or synchronize their labor. “The Scotsman” has since racked up 2.7 million views (and counting). Evans posted another chantey performance a few days later, this time of “The Wellerman,” a piece more than a century old that likely originated with the small-boat whalers of New Zealand in the mid-nineteenth-century (a Wellerman was an employee of the Weller Brothers, which operated a whaling station on Otago Harbor, and paid its fishermen with “sugar and tea and rum”). The video presently has 4.1 million views, and has inspired imitations, remixes, homages, and the recording of ever more chanteys. According to Google Trends, “sea shanties” has been searched more now than at any other time in Google’s history. “I don’t really know what happened,” Evans told CNET.

It feels worth pointing out (particularly if you are accustomed to a more sly and mocking youth culture) that TikTok’s sudden embrace of the chantey is not ironic, exactly. In one especially popular reaction video, two young men drive while “The Wellerman” plays. The guy on the left knows all the words, and is singing along; soon, the guy on the right is doing it, too. “Now we lit,” a caption reads. There appears to be genuine pleasure on both of their faces.

It seems possible that after nearly a year of solitude and collective self-banishment, and of crushing restrictions on travel and adventure, the chantey might be providing a brief glimpse into a different, more exciting way of life, a world of sea air and pirates and grog, of many people singing in unison, of being free to boldly take off for what Melville called the “true places,” the uncorrupted vistas that can’t be located on any map. But it’s also not unusual for something to gain purchase on TikTok simply because it is unexpected. TikTok runs on an engine of chaos and unpredictability; users of the app are not expected to make logical sense of its offerings. Instead, TikTok is a narrative-free zone, which means it can work as a kind of psychic balm if you are prone to exhausting yourself by scouring art or media for meaning. On TikTok, there is no meaning beyond what is visceral and immediate. For me, at least, that can sometimes feel nice. As my colleague Jia Tolentino wrote back in 2019, “I found it both freeing and disturbing to spend time on a platform that didn’t ask me to pretend that I was on the Internet for a good reason.”

I should admit that, even prior to the rebirth of sea chanteys as a meme, I have spent many hours listening to them earnestly—if you are at all interested in American vernacular music of the prewar era, it is not an especially long walk from Delta blues to work songs of all stripes (the field hollers, “arwhoolies,” and prison songs of enslaved Black people; the hundreds if not thousands of folk songs about mining, logging, or working on the railroad). Although we tend to associate chanteys with nineteenth-century European whaling voyages, they existed in America in the twentieth century, too. (The Library of Congress and Smithsonian Folkways are excellent places to start if you’re remotely curious about the chantey tradition in the U.S..) I first found my way into the form via the Menhaden Chanteymen of Carteret County, North Carolina, a group of retired menhaden fishermen who, in the late nineteen-eighties, began publicly performing the chanteys they once used to rhythmically haul fish out of the sea in and around Beaufort, North Carolina.

The Menhaden Chanteymen’s repertoire has elements of call-and-response gospel (and, in particular, of sacred-harp singing, a style that originated in New England, but has roots in eighteenth-century Anglican parish music), but it also feels distinct to its time, place, and circumstance. Menhaden are a silvery forage fish, constitutionally similar to herring, but less palatable; they spawn year-round in the coastal waters of the North Atlantic, from Nova Scotia to central Florida. Though menhaden fishing has since been mechanized (and, in some regions, restricted or eradicated entirely for environmental reasons), the fish was once widely processed for use in fertilizers, as animal feed, in fish oil supplements, or as bait for catching blue crab and lobster. Life is not easy for the menhaden: besides fishing trawlers, they are also pursued by striped bass, dolphins, sharks, bluefish, herons, gulls, ospreys, and pelicans. The nineteenth-century ichthyologist George Brown Goode once described menhaden as inherently doomed, “swarming our waters in countless myriads, swimming in closely-packed, unwieldy masses, helpless as flocks of sheep, close to the surface and at the mercy of any enemy, destitute of means of defense or offense, their mission is unmistakably to be eaten.”

Menhaden were collected along the Atlantic coast by predominantly Black crews, who dragged large nets called purse seines through the sea. Often, the men used song to coördinate the hauling in of their seines, an elaborate and precise process outlined in crisp, addictive detail in John Frye’s remarkable “The Men All Singing,” easily the “Moby-Dick” of menhaden lore. “At first the net came up yard by yard. The men’s fingers clawed into the mesh. Their shoulder and back muscles flexed. The men leaned back, their feet at first solid against the white oak ribs of the purse boat, then somehow finding footing amid the folds of the net,” Frye writes.

It was the chanteyman’s job to draw upon a storehouse of rhythmic couplets that might inspire the men to keep pulling in unison. “It soon came to a point where muscle was not enough,” Frye writes. “Another verse, another foot. ‘Each pull they’d sing.’ Their voices, like their muscles, were attuned to everybody else’s.” Between verses, the men would clown on each other, engaging in a brash and chiding repartee that Frye lovingly describes as “noisy obscene chatter… like a flock of geese quarreling over corn.” Though many of these chanties have since been transcribed (far fewer have been recorded), one gets the sense that the vibe on the boat was too dynamic and boisterous to be properly represented on the page:

Chanteyman: I left my baby standin’ in the back door cryin’, Honey, don’t go!
Fishermen: Lawd, Lawd, don’t go! (Shouting and chatter)
Chanteyman: I’d go home but ain’t got no money!
Fishermen: (drawing words out) Lawd, Lawd, ain’t got no money! (Shouting and chatter)
Chanteyman: To pay my way!
Fishermen: Lawd. Lawd, to pa-ay my wa-ay! (Shouting and chatter).

Frye suggests that the menhaden chanteys originated in North Carolina, and later inspired regional variations. He quotes Charles E. Williams, a fisherman aboard the Stephen J. McKeever in 1929: “The chanteys moved up the Chesapeake Bay and on north,” Williams said. “Off Delaware they had their own. Sometimes after a hard day when we sang a lot, I couldn’t talk at night.” It’s treacherous, of course, to romanticize labor—particularly labor that was often backbreaking, segregated, and poorly paid. But there is, nonetheless, real beauty in the chanteymen’s heavy, rhythmic singing, in the way the crew briefly blurred together, briefly becoming a single body. In a moment where we are looking for escape and communion wherever we can find it, #shanteytok, as it has come to be called, feels like a safe and welcome portal to anywhere but here.

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January 14, 2021 at 10:53PM
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4 Reasons I Bought Sea Limited Stock - The Motley Fool

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When Sea Limited (NYSE:SE) went public in late 2017, I wasn't impressed by the Singapore-based e-commerce and gaming company. Its revenue was soaring, but its losses were widening as it faced tough competition in Southeast Asia from Alibaba's (NYSE:BABA) Lazada.

I turned bullish last August when I realized Sea's profits from its gaming business, Garena, were offsetting the losses from its e-commerce platform, Shopee. But I was still reluctant to buy the stock since it seemed a bit too expensive relative to other e-commerce and gaming stocks.

Yet Sea's stock has still surged more than 450% over the past 12 months, as the pandemic lit a fire under its e-commerce and gaming businesses. I generally don't like to chase high-flying stocks, but I finally started a small position in Sea, for four simple reasons.

Sea's offices in Singapore.

Image source: Sea Group.

1. It's not a Chinese tech stock

Last year, Chinese tech stocks accounted for about a fifth of my portfolio. However, it's getting much tougher to own those stocks amid escalating trade, tech, and political tensions between the U.S. and China.

In December, the U.S. passed a law that would delist Chinese stocks from American exchanges if they didn't comply with U.S. auditing rules for three consecutive years. Earlier this month, the Trump administration forced the New York Stock Exchange to delist China's three largest telecom companies over their alleged ties to the Chinese military -- and more delistings could follow. Meanwhile, Chinese regulators launched new antitrust laws to rein in tech giants like Alibaba and Tencent

In short, Chinese tech stocks are stuck between a rock and a hard place. So I recently sold most of my Chinese stocks and put some of that cash into Sea -- which should be well-insulated from those regulatory threats.

2. Robust revenue growth

Sea's revenue rose 163% to $2.18 billion last year. Its digital entertainment revenue, which mainly comes from Garena, grew 146% to $1.14 billion. Its e-commerce and other services revenue, which mainly come from Shopee and its fintech services, surged 205% to $823 million.

In the first nine months of 2020, Sea's revenue rose another 101% year over year to $2.81 billion. Its digital entertainment revenue grew 81% to $1.32 billion, while its e-commerce and other services revenue jumped 113% to $1.12 billion.

Sea attributed Garena's growth to the popularity of Free Fire, a self-developed battle royale game that was launched in 2017 and remains the highest-grossing mobile game in Southeast Asia and Latin America. It's currently testing out an enhanced successor, Free Fire MAX, in several markets.

Shopee, which surpassed Lazada in total downloads across Southeast Asia and Taiwan last year, benefited from a surge in online shopping throughout the pandemic as its gross orders more than doubled year over year throughout all three quarters of 2020.

Its integrated payments platform, SeaMoney, also reached 17.8 million paying users with its mobile wallet in the third quarter -- up from 10 million users in the first quarter and 15 million users in the second quarter. The expansion of this fintech platform widens Sea's moat against Alipay, the Alibaba-affiliated payment service integrated into Lazada.

3. Improving profitability

In the past, Shopee's losses consistently wiped out Garena's profits. However, Sea gradually reduced Shopee's losses per order by dialing back its promotions and subsidies. As a result, Shopee ended the third quarter with an adjusted EBITDA loss of $0.41 per order -- compared to losses of $0.79 in the prior-year quarter and $1.36 in the third quarter of 2018.

Shopee and SeaMoney remain unprofitable, but the strength of the company's digital entertainment segment is easily offsetting those losses:

Adjusted EBITDA (in millions)

FY 2019

Q1 2020

Q2 2020

Q3 2020

Digital Entertainment

$1,021.9

$298.4

$436.2

$584.5

E-commerce

($1,043.3)

($260.0)

($305.5)

($301.6)

Digital Finance Services

($113.4)

($101.6)

($110.1)

($149.3)

Other Services

($28.0)

($2.6)

($6.4)

($9.1)

Total

($178.6)

($69.9)

$7.7

$120.4

Source: Sea Limited.

The profitability of Sea's gaming business can be compared to Alibaba's high-margin core commerce business, which offsets the losses from its other unprofitable businesses, or Amazon's (NASDAQ:AMZN) cloud business, which subsidies the growth of its lower-margin marketplaces.

Garena is admittedly wobblier and less-diversified than Alibaba's marketplaces or Amazon Web Services (AWS), but it could continue to offset Sea's losses at Shopee and SeaMoney for the foreseeable future.

4. It's still reasonably valued

Analysts expect Sea's revenue to rise 78% this year and 46% next year. Its adjusted EBITDA should remain positive, and analysts expect its GAAP net loss to narrow next year.

Based on those forecasts, Sea trades at 15 times next year's sales -- which is a surprisingly low price-to-sales ratio in a market filled with growth stocks trading at 30 to 40 times next year's sales. Sea certainly isn't a value stock, but I believe it's undervalued relative to its growth potential.

The bottom line

Based on these facts, I'm willing to take a chance on this budding tech company as a long-term play on Southeast Asia's growing e-commerce, fintech, and gaming industries. It might be a bumpy ride, but I believe it could generate more multibagger gains over the next few years.

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January 14, 2021 at 07:30PM
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Rare 500-pound sea turtle washes up dead on Hatteras Island at North Carolina's Outer Banks - WTVD-TV

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FRISCO, N.C. -- A species of sea turtle that is rarely seen on North Carolina's Outer Banks has been found dead in a Frisco marsh near the Pamlico Sound.

The Virginian-Pilot reported Tuesday that biologists have so far been unable to find a cause of death of the leatherback sea turtle.


The creature weighed upwards of 500 pounds. And biologists solicited the help of a construction company's crane to lift the dead animal onto a barge and take it in for a necropsy.

ALSO SEE | Iguanas aren't the only animals struggling in the cold; record number of sea turtles arrive at NC rehab center

Biologists with the North Carolina Wildlife Resources Commission and the National Park Service found no obvious cause of death. The investigation revealed no physical injuries, plastics in the intestines or major parasites. But the animal's organs suggested the animal was under physiological stress.

WATCH: Loggerhead turtle triumphantly returns to the sea


Leatherback sea turtles are especially rare on the Outer Banks and are typically not bothered by cold water.

Lou Browning of Hatteras Island Wildlife Rehabilitation said leatherback turtles are "beautiful creatures that we know so little about."

Copyright © 2021 by The Associated Press. All Rights Reserved.

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January 14, 2021 at 11:51PM
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Divers resume sea search for crashed plane's 2nd black box - CBS 3 Duluth

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JAKARTA, Indonesia (AP) — An aerial search for victims and wreckage from a crashed Indonesian plane has expanded as divers continue combing the debris-littered seabed looking for the cockpit voice recorder from the lost Sriwijaya Air jet. The jet disappeared Saturday minutes after taking off from Jakarta with 62 people aboard. The other black box containing flight data was recovered Tuesday, and searchers have also recovered plane parts and human remains from the Java Sea. So far, six victims have been identified, including a flight attendant who was buried Thursday.

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January 14, 2021 at 09:39AM
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Divers resume sea search for crashed plane's 2nd black box - CBS 3 Duluth

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Rabu, 13 Januari 2021

State Habitat Restoration Project Breaks Ground at Southern End of Salton Sea - Environmental Defense Fund

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(Westmorland, Calif., January 13, 2021) – The California Salton Sea Management Program began construction this week on a nearly 4,000-acre project to restore bird and fish habitat and improve conditions for nearby communities at the southern end of the Salton Sea.

T he Species Conservation Habitat Project (SCH) will reduce wind-borne dust pollution in a region to the east and west of the New River delta, lessening dangerous dust pollution affecting nearby communities, while also creating habitat for birds and serving as a water-management pond for future projects in the area.The SCH will be constructed on what is now exposed, dust-emitting lakebed, or playa. It will include several types of habitat areas to accommodate a variety of shorebirds, wading birds and waterfowl. 

The SCH will anchor Phase I of the state’s Salton Sea Management Program, which focuses on constructing wetlands and other projects to reduce exposed playa and health hazards posed by airborne dust across 30,000 acres, as well as serve as a model for creating various types of habitat in other parts of the lake.

“Starting long-awaited construction on the Species Habitat Conservation project signals California leaders are finally taking responsibility for averting a major environmental and ecological crisis at the Salton Sea,” said Maurice Hall, associate vice president of Environmental Defense Fund’s Water Program. “We applaud the Newsom administration for making good on its commitment to stop making verbal promises and start taking action to get projects done that will improve conditions for people and wildlife around the state’s largest lake.”

“We are hopeful this project is the beginning of a more expedient implementation of the SSMP,” said Silvia Paz, executive director with Alianza Coachella Valley. “We applaud Governor Newsom’s administration and recognize the local leadership of Assemblyman Eduardo Garcia, which has gotten us to this awaited point, to begin mitigating the negative impacts the drying Salton Sea has on nearby communities. We encourage our representatives to treat investments at the Salton Sea as opportunities to create multi-benefits that expand access to outdoor spaces as well as put our communities on our way to economic recovery after this devastating pandemic.”

“After years of false starts and delays, shovels have finally hit the ground and the Species Conservation Project is becoming a reality,” said Frank Ruiz, director of Audubon California’s Salton Sea Program. “As we enter our second year of a deadly pandemic during a tumultuous election season, that’s something to celebrate. We are simply out of time – if we allow the Sea to continue to decline, the health impacts on surrounding communities and the effect on the millions of migratory birds from Alaska to the Amazon will be catastrophic.”

“We commend the state’s leadership, staff and their contractor for starting to construct much-needed habitat and dust suppression projects at the Salton Sea,” said Michael Cohen, senior associate at the Pacific Institute. “SCH will be a vital demonstration of state commitment and the value – to both people and wildlife – of investing in the Salton Sea.”

“It is long overdue, but we are encouraged that the state is finally breaking ground on dust suppression and habitat restoration efforts at the Salton Sea,” said Brandon Dawson, policy advocate at the California Sierra Club. “For too long, communities have suffered from polluted air and land quality loss created by the failure to clean up the Sea. In the middle of a pandemic and extinction crisis, the need for clean air, access to the outdoors, and healthy habitat has never been more important. The state must urgently tackle more restoration projects to protect local communities and public health.”

With an estimated surface area of 320 square miles, the Salton Sea is by far California’s largest lake, as well as a vital stop for migrating birds along the Pacific Flyway. Threatened by contaminated runoff and reduced inflow from changing water-usage patterns, the Sea is degrading rapidly, exposing airborne dust from the dry lakebed that endangers the health of the 650,000 residents who live in the immediate area. The Salton Sea is also a vital stopover for many bird species migrating along the Pacific Flyway.

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January 14, 2021 at 03:13AM
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State Habitat Restoration Project Breaks Ground at Southern End of Salton Sea - Environmental Defense Fund

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