Kamis, 11 Februari 2021

Researching Ocean Level Rising From Historical Logs : Short Wave - NPR

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A 1930 tidal chart from the village of Bowling on the Firth of Clyde Andrew Matthews hide caption

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Andrew Matthews

A 1930 tidal chart from the village of Bowling on the Firth of Clyde

Andrew Matthews

Archival records may help researchers figure out how fast the sea level is rising in certain places. Millions of people in coastal cities are vulnerable to rising sea levels and knowing exactly how fast the water is rising is really important. But it's a tough scientific question. NPR climate correspondent Lauren Sommer explains how scientists are looking to historical records to help get at the answer.

If you'd like to help transcribe old tidal data, you can get started here.

For more of Lauren's reporting, follow her on Twitter @lesommer. Email us at ShortWave@npr.org.

This episode was produced by Thomas Lu, edited Gisele Grayson with help from Maddie Sofia, and fact-checked by Rasha Aridi. The audio engineer for this episode was Josh Newell.

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February 11, 2021 at 04:00PM
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Researching Ocean Level Rising From Historical Logs : Short Wave - NPR

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